broadcast

TheIJC.com - The 6th European edition of The Inkjet Conference - Düsseldorf, 29 - 30 October 2019. The place to be for Inkjet Engineering and Inkjet Chemistry

Programme

This is TheIJC 2018 programme. The agenda for the 2019 edition will be published at a later date.

  • DAY 1 - Track 1 (16.10.2018)

    Time Topic
    09:00
    CONFERENCE INTRODUCTION
    09:15
    PLENARY SESSION: Recirculating printheads for industrial applications
    Ricoh
    Inkjet printing is expanding rapidly in industrial applications, such as textiles, décor, label and packaging. Recirculation is a hot topic of discussion at almost every customer meeting. It seems recirculation is still puzzling some people. This talk will illustrate recirculation mechanisms. From the viewpoints of "to use or not to use" the recirculation cases will be analysed based on multiple pass and single pass systems. The effect of recirculation will be explained based on experiments and measurements using specifically designed equipment. This talk intends to give the audience a better understanding of recirculation and its effectiveness.
    09:45
    PLENARY SESSION: Time to stop with the inkjet evolution: Let’s get going with the real revolution
    Xaar
    There is always so much talk about the huge potential for digital inkjet. The graphics and ceramics sector have both successfully converted, and there has long been speculation about the textiles or packaging sector following suit. But whilst adoption of inkjet is growing, it may not be happening as fast as we want. What will it really take to transform these markets? Many new inkjet printers today have evolved from modifications or developments of existing printing machinery using skills and hardware from adjacent markets such as graphics and ceramics. Many are based upon older printhead technologies. To kick-start the inkjet revolution we need new core technologies – and specifically a new generation of digital inkjet printheads. In this presentation, we will talk about some of the new inkjet technology developed to aid these market transformations and how they could bring about the real inkjet revolution.
    10:15
    PLENARY SESSION: Development of logic-based methodologies for quantitative and qualitative analysis of nozzle jetting and printhead performance
    Fujifilm Dimatix
    As Fujifilm Dimatix continues to drive the development of Silicon MEMS printhead design and performance to offer solutions into ever more demanding applications, there is a parallel need to develop and utilise advanced methodologies and technology to measure and analyse the performance and behavior of the jetting nozzles and arrays. Assessing the performance of the printhead, in combination with a variety of inks and test fluids, across key parameters, such as duty cycle, frequency, drop velocity or drop mass conditions, with the objective of simulating real-world, in-printer conditions, allows Dimatix to deliver robust and reliable printheads to the market, which meet the application requirements. With the increased ability to acquire large quantities of data, efforts have been made to improve the measurement and evaluation of these metrics, including faster, more robust detection and analysis of printed patterns for drop placement and line centroids, and using logic-based methods for assigning and correlating data on jet straightness errors and missing jets, within a given printhead geometry, with respect to operating conditions. These continued improvements to the sustainability testing methodology and analysis have enabled Dimatix to develop a better understanding of printhead performance and operability, to ensure Dimatix printheads meet the demanding needs of their customers.
    10:45
    PLENARY SESSION: Considerations for inkjet printhead selection
    Kyocera
    Inkjet has been adopted in variety of industrial fields through past 10 years by accumulation of experience with advanced inkjet printheads (IJP) such as KJ4 series by Kyocera. Among the subjects through the process especially at starting up of any new application development, selection of IJP has been an important issue for integrators. Actually, there is plenty of information for any printhead specification in the market such as official data sheet, advertisement, articles published in website or industrial magazines. But, it is not always easy for inkjet beginners to understand and correlate the information to the specific interest of their industry. So, we would like to introduce general idea how IJP specification can be understood for the selection of an appropriate one for pragmatic industrial use by referring data sheets of KJ4 series. And, let us introduce an extended idea “hybrid integration” in which plural IJP models are applied to different functions through the production process with an example.
    11:15
    COFFEE BREAK AND TABLETOP NETWORKING
    11:45
    Inkjet market update and 5-year forecasts
    Smithers Pira
    The presentation covers the results of Smithers Pira’s latest researches into the inkjet printing and packaging markets. It will show the latest data on the values of inkjet print output, discussing the trends and drivers. The technology developments coming to the market are changing the competitive landscape for print production – opening new opportunities and providing more effective methods of production – particularly in the fast-changing packaging and industrial printing sectors.
    12:15
    The best of both worlds
    Global Graphics Software
    Is it really possible to achieve blistering speeds with variable data and maintain optimum quality? How do you keep the presses running with no waiting time when every printed piece is different from the next? How do you mitigate artifacts like banding, or the inkjet smile, at the same time? Tom Mooney discusses a software engine that can drive data directly to the electronics whilst correcting for common quality defects. He draws upon two recent customer use cases.
    12:45
    Digital printing for multi-material functional components manufacturing: Printed electronics and smart 3D printing applications
    Ceradrop
    Addressing numerous complex tasks in emerging applications, we draw your attention to flexible industrial digital printing solutions. Based on our deep expertise in printed electronics and smart 3D printing, we are going to introduce both the advanced modular-based platforms enabling process development and 24/7 manufacturing presses. You discover the latest features of our hybrid modular-based system, highlighting the combination of inkjet and many other digital materials deposition technologies; its in-line integrated multi-curing modules as a disruptive solution together with the power of exclusive advanced software suite (bottom-up CAD-CAM approach) to design and print complex functional multi-material devices and visualise concrete results of numerous applications areas.
    13:15
    LUNCH AND TABLETOP NETWORKING
    14:30
    Direct to shape printing of complex objects
    Global Inkjet Systems
    Direct-to-shape printing onto cylinders and cones is now established. These relatively simple shapes are sufficient for many products – but what about the complex surfaces seen in organic and functional designs? The demand for using inkjet technology for applying coatings and decoration in manufacturing is increasing. This presentation will look at the challenges and opportunities of working with robotic systems and inkjet.
    15:00
    Industrial print system design
    Polytype
    Despite all recent discussions about digitalisation, the industrial world of today is still shaped by its mechanical past. Industrial applications often require heavier, more robust and consequently more expensive equipment than comparable applications in the consumer world. The demands on industrial equipment in terms of reliability, longevity and maintainability are very challenging. Inkjet is a prime example of the gap between the old-fashioned virtues of the industrial world and the new, delicate and digital technology – building an industrial inkjet printer is an undertaking that can only be successful if both old and new worlds are considered. Wifag//Polytype Technologies is often confronted with these very questions and is working together with its customers and suppliers to meet the demanding requirements of the market.
    15:30
    2.5D-3D printing: New trends in digital surface creation with inkjet
    ColorGATE
    The addition of properties to digitally created surfaces is a rapidly growing trend. The speaker gives an introduction about the possibilities to add structures, tactile and reflectance effects to digitally decorated surface products. How can designers take advantage of the new possibilities and how can producers ensure product quality and consistency?
    16:00
    COFFEE BREAK AND TABLETOP NETWORKING
    16:30
    Latest innovation for CIS (contact image sensors) for digital print
    Tichawa Vision
    17:00
    Automatic Optical Inspection (AOI) and process control based on defect classification
    Baumer Inspection
    To make digital printing production more tolerant and easier to control, the expert experience needs to be integrated into the AOI. The digital printing has its big advantages and its challenges – as all movements from analogue to digital technologies. The brilliant quality that it produces requires careful planning, image and texture capture, system calibration and naturally an effective way to control the output quality. Customer expectations and requirements are always increasing. Our presentation provides insights into modern automated optical inspection that allow streamlined production, quality control, and the confidence that consistent output is achievable.
    17:30
    Inkjet printing for functional applications: From lab to fab
    Notion Systems
    Based on our experience and filled with real live examples, in this talk we would like to give an overview of inkjet applications and provide a guideline for a systematic approach to transferring an inkjet process for functional applications from „lab to fab“. We will present a modular machine concept that considers flexible lab requirements as well as industrial requirements, such as high throughput, accuracy or automation. We will explain and discuss the importance of data preparation, which is the base of each printed image. We will cover the choice and interactions of printheads, materials and substrates including substrate pre- and post-treatments. We will explain the importance of a well-tuned waveform for reliable jetting and discuss printing strategies and ink solidification mechanisms.
    18:00
    Freedom to operate (FTO): Digital printing for textiles
    Extract Information
    Establishing ‘freedom to operate’ for a new product or process is an essential task on the road to market in any industry. But what is FTO? This talk will define FTO and provide a pragmatic approach to FTO search and analysis with examples from textile inks and inkjet printing. We will review FTO strategies from the perspective of a fabric ink manufacturer, a fabric supplier, and a textile printer hardware manufacturer. Whatever IPRs are found during an FTO study there are always options. Decisions taken on the outcome of an FTO analysis will depend on the IPRs identified, but also on the company’s attitude to risk and its business plan. It should be noted that any FTO review is but a snapshot in time. In the words of Heraclitus ‘one cannot step twice into the same river’. Accordingly, the talk will conclude by looking at strategies to maintain FTO by portfolio watching, monitoring new technologies and reviewing known inventions.
    19:00
    NETWORKING DINNER
  • DAY 1 - Track 2 (16.10.2018)

    Time Topic
    09:00
    CONFERENCE INTRODUCTION
    09:15
    PLENARY SESSION: Recirculating printheads for industrial applications
    Ricoh
    Inkjet printing is expanding rapidly in industrial applications, such as textiles, décor, label and packaging. Recirculation is a hot topic of discussion at almost every customer meeting. It seems recirculation is still puzzling some people. This talk will illustrate recirculation mechanisms. From the viewpoints of "to use or not to use" the recirculation cases will be analysed based on multiple pass and single pass systems. The effect of recirculation will be explained based on experiments and measurements using specifically designed equipment. This talk intends to give the audience a better understanding of recirculation and its effectiveness.
    09:45
    PLENARY SESSION: Time to stop with the inkjet evolution: Let’s get going with the real revolution
    Xaar
    There is always so much talk about the huge potential for digital inkjet. The graphics and ceramics sector have both successfully converted, and there has long been speculation about the textiles or packaging sector following suit. But whilst adoption of inkjet is growing, it may not be happening as fast as we want. What will it really take to transform these markets? Many new inkjet printers today have evolved from modifications or developments of existing printing machinery using skills and hardware from adjacent markets such as graphics and ceramics. Many are based upon older printhead technologies. To kick-start the inkjet revolution we need new core technologies – and specifically a new generation of digital inkjet printheads. In this presentation, we will talk about some of the new inkjet technology developed to aid these market transformations and how they could bring about the real inkjet revolution.
    10:15
    PLENARY SESSION: Development of logic-based methodologies for quantitative and qualitative analysis of nozzle jetting and printhead performance
    Fujifilm Dimatix
    As Fujifilm Dimatix continues to drive the development of Silicon MEMS printhead design and performance to offer solutions into ever more demanding applications, there is a parallel need to develop and utilise advanced methodologies and technology to measure and analyse the performance and behavior of the jetting nozzles and arrays. Assessing the performance of the printhead, in combination with a variety of inks and test fluids, across key parameters, such as duty cycle, frequency, drop velocity or drop mass conditions, with the objective of simulating real-world, in-printer conditions, allows Dimatix to deliver robust and reliable printheads to the market, which meet the application requirements. With the increased ability to acquire large quantities of data, efforts have been made to improve the measurement and evaluation of these metrics, including faster, more robust detection and analysis of printed patterns for drop placement and line centroids, and using logic-based methods for assigning and correlating data on jet straightness errors and missing jets, within a given printhead geometry, with respect to operating conditions. These continued improvements to the sustainability testing methodology and analysis have enabled Dimatix to develop a better understanding of printhead performance and operability, to ensure Dimatix printheads meet the demanding needs of their customers.
    10:45
    PLENARY SESSION: Considerations for inkjet printhead selection
    Kyocera
    Inkjet has been adopted in variety of industrial fields through past 10 years by accumulation of experience with advanced inkjet printheads (IJP) such as KJ4 series by Kyocera. Among the subjects through the process especially at starting up of any new application development, selection of IJP has been an important issue for integrators. Actually, there is plenty of information for any printhead specification in the market such as official data sheet, advertisement, articles published in website or industrial magazines. But, it is not always easy for inkjet beginners to understand and correlate the information to the specific interest of their industry. So, we would like to introduce general idea how IJP specification can be understood for the selection of an appropriate one for pragmatic industrial use by referring data sheets of KJ4 series. And, let us introduce an extended idea “hybrid integration” in which plural IJP models are applied to different functions through the production process with an example.
    11:15
    COFFEE BREAK AND TABLETOP NETWORKING
    11:45
    Future strategies for energy curing ink design
    Sun Chemical
    UV-curing inkjet inks are well established in graphics, label and industrial decoration and beginning to be utilised in packaging applications. However, with the advent of increasingly capable LED curing devices there are now three options available for curing the inks: mercury, LED or ebeam. This presentation will consider the implications these curing methods have on ink design and their relative pros and cons. Additionally, the impact that printhead choice has on curing as well as regulatory, food safety for packaging and image quality considerations will be discussed.
    12:15
    Inkjet inks to colour your living space
    Agfa
    The design of your interior can be upgraded by using inkjet printing to personalise your living space. Specific inkjet inks are needed to fulfill the customer demands as well as the technical requirement of the print solutions. Several specific examples of printed interior decoration will be explained. The power of the inkjet colour inks will be reviewed from the ink design, print process and end result.
    12:45
    UV LED surface cure and low migration/low odour answers for inkjet inks
    Allnex
    In this presentation, we will cover our latest developments in two recent projects that support leading edge LED UV inkjet inks. The first development solves the UV LED surface curing issue with an LED booster approach intended for 100% active inkjet inks. The second development conquers the expense, odour and regulatory issues associated with monofunctional monomers through the use of waterborne UV curable resins.
    13:15
    LUNCH AND TABLETOP NETWORKING
    14:30
    A new combination instrument to monitor pigment size and overgrains
    Microtrac
    As printhead and inkjet technologies are progressing, the demand for characterisation of inks regarding their pigment size, single oversized grains and colloidal stability is increasing. The size of pigments has an impact on factors like printability, printhead blockages, sharpness of texture, optical density and colour gamut. Microtrac introduces a new technology which combines, for the first time, data from laser diffraction and Dynamic Image Analysis, for both wet and dry samples. The size distribution of the inkjet ink is measured by the laser technology, while the optical image detects size and shape of larger particles. This enables users to monitor the milling process, to assess the final product and to detect single oversized particles or clumps which cause a risk for blockages.
    15:00
    Struggling to stabilise your organic pigment dispersions?
    Evonik
    When formulators face ink storage stability issues, the most probable culprit tends to be an instable pigment dispersion. With the rising importance of global trade, ensuring long-term shelf-life stability of inkjet inks is becoming a top technical and commercial priority in the industry. Our talk will highlight how to obtain high-performance, stable inkjet grade dispersions using the Evonik Zetasperse line of polymeric dispersants. The theory and mechanisms behind improving pigment grinding efficiency and successfully stabilising particles of less than d50 of 200nm at low dispersant additional levels will be discussed.
    15:30
    The winning resin technology for inkjet in packaging
    DSM Resins
    The packaging market is embracing the advantages of digital printing resulting in an extremely promising market for players in inkjet. The penetration of inkjet in packaging depends strongly on the segment, with labels being progressed most and flexible packaging still being embryonic, resulting in a strong need for development of the digital presses in combination with tailored primers, inks and coatings. The selection of the right resin technology approach for these applications is complex due to the need to balance the print reliability with performance on the substrate (after dry/cure) and regulatory compliance. Based on its long background in packaging and expertise in waterborne, energy curing and solvent borne technologies, DSM has a unique position and from this perspective it will present the potential of each resin technology for inkjet packaging applications.
    16:00
    COFFEE BREAK AND TABLETOP NETWORKING
    16:30
    Inkjet printing of edible inks: Challenges for food and pharmaceutical applications
    Sensient
    As personalisation grows throughout print applications, emerging sectors such as baked goods, confectionary and pharmaceutical are looking to leverage inkjet printing to add value to their products. Creating an ink that is edible is a challenge in materials selection but more in terms of the regulatory requirements to be compliant with global standards. The ink has a critical impact on the suitability for a printed cookie or pill to be accepted as safe and so control of materials, manufacturing processes and supply of this is a key consideration. As a world leader in both the manufacture of food colours and the development of inkjet inks, Sensient is uniquely placed to master in depth the protection of consumer health by leveraging years of experience in regulatory aspects to ensure a product that is safe to use.
    17:00
    Inkjet inks for labels and packaging
    Siegwerk
    The presentation begins with a quick introduction to Siegwerk and the explanation of the recent deal with Agfa. Furthermore the challenges addressed by the label and the packaging segments to the inkjet technology will be discussed: The questions range from “Why one ink technology does not fit all?” to “The relevance of the application expertise brought to the ink formulation and the complexity of compliance for sensitive food, hygiene and pharma applications”.
    17:30
    New water-based inkjet ink with polyester resin technology
    Kao Collins
    There have always been desires to substitute water-based printing solutions for solvent-based solutions and energy curable solutions because of its environmental friendliness. Water-based inkjet solutions for non-absorptive substrates, such as flexible packaging, have been intensively developed and are starting to be introduced. However, challenges remain in order to open up real industrial applications with a water-based solution. One of the challenges for water-based inkjet ink is to improve the image durability, which is highly desired from the industrial market. In this presentation, a new water-based ink with polyester resin and its high durability against weathering, alcohol, and scratch will be introduced. Pigment nano-dispersion technology and polyester resin technology, which have been widely used for toner in electrical photography, were combined to develop a highly durable water-based inkjet ink. The new polyester-based ink could achieve comparable durability to that provided by UV curable ink whereas the ink film layer is approximately one-tenth of UV ink film. This technology could open up new industrial markets for inkjet ink, such as flexible packaging and signage application.
    18:00
    Possibilities of digital printing for exterior and interior architectural applications
    Tiger Coatings
    This presentation will give an overview of architectural applications that can be already covered by digital printing today. Regarding exterior applications, the focus will be the decoration of terraces made from concrete and decking boards and facades made of glass, anodized aluminum and powder coated surfaces. Interior wise, the digital printing of different types of flooring and other laminated products will be discussed.
    19:00
    NETWORKING DINNER
  • DAY 1 - Track 3 (16.10.2018)

    Time Topic
    09:00
    CONFERENCE INTRODUCTION
    09:15
    PLENARY SESSION: Recirculating printheads for industrial applications
    Ricoh
    Inkjet printing is expanding rapidly in industrial applications, such as textiles, décor, label and packaging. Recirculation is a hot topic of discussion at almost every customer meeting. It seems recirculation is still puzzling some people. This talk will illustrate recirculation mechanisms. From the viewpoints of "to use or not to use" the recirculation cases will be analysed based on multiple pass and single pass systems. The effect of recirculation will be explained based on experiments and measurements using specifically designed equipment. This talk intends to give the audience a better understanding of recirculation and its effectiveness.
    09:45
    PLENARY SESSION: Time to stop with the inkjet evolution: Let’s get going with the real revolution
    Xaar
    There is always so much talk about the huge potential for digital inkjet. The graphics and ceramics sector have both successfully converted, and there has long been speculation about the textiles or packaging sector following suit. But whilst adoption of inkjet is growing, it may not be happening as fast as we want. What will it really take to transform these markets? Many new inkjet printers today have evolved from modifications or developments of existing printing machinery using skills and hardware from adjacent markets such as graphics and ceramics. Many are based upon older printhead technologies. To kick-start the inkjet revolution we need new core technologies – and specifically a new generation of digital inkjet printheads. In this presentation, we will talk about some of the new inkjet technology developed to aid these market transformations and how they could bring about the real inkjet revolution.
    10:15
    PLENARY SESSION: Development of logic-based methodologies for quantitative and qualitative analysis of nozzle jetting and printhead performance
    Fujifilm Dimatix
    As Fujifilm Dimatix continues to drive the development of Silicon MEMS printhead design and performance to offer solutions into ever more demanding applications, there is a parallel need to develop and utilise advanced methodologies and technology to measure and analyse the performance and behavior of the jetting nozzles and arrays. Assessing the performance of the printhead, in combination with a variety of inks and test fluids, across key parameters, such as duty cycle, frequency, drop velocity or drop mass conditions, with the objective of simulating real-world, in-printer conditions, allows Dimatix to deliver robust and reliable printheads to the market, which meet the application requirements. With the increased ability to acquire large quantities of data, efforts have been made to improve the measurement and evaluation of these metrics, including faster, more robust detection and analysis of printed patterns for drop placement and line centroids, and using logic-based methods for assigning and correlating data on jet straightness errors and missing jets, within a given printhead geometry, with respect to operating conditions. These continued improvements to the sustainability testing methodology and analysis have enabled Dimatix to develop a better understanding of printhead performance and operability, to ensure Dimatix printheads meet the demanding needs of their customers.
    10:45
    PLENARY SESSION: Considerations for inkjet printhead selection
    Kyocera
    Inkjet has been adopted in variety of industrial fields through past 10 years by accumulation of experience with advanced inkjet printheads (IJP) such as KJ4 series by Kyocera. Among the subjects through the process especially at starting up of any new application development, selection of IJP has been an important issue for integrators. Actually, there is plenty of information for any printhead specification in the market such as official data sheet, advertisement, articles published in website or industrial magazines. But, it is not always easy for inkjet beginners to understand and correlate the information to the specific interest of their industry. So, we would like to introduce general idea how IJP specification can be understood for the selection of an appropriate one for pragmatic industrial use by referring data sheets of KJ4 series. And, let us introduce an extended idea “hybrid integration” in which plural IJP models are applied to different functions through the production process with an example.
    11:15
    COFFEE BREAK AND TABLETOP NETWORKING
    11:45
    Inkjet printing of organometal halide perovskite absorber layers for optoelectronic devices
    Helmholtz Zentrum
    In this work, we demonstrate ambient inkjet-printed organometal halide perovskite absorber layers. We developed a fabrication process to form optical dense and pinhole-free absorber layers via an inkjet-printing approach which impressive film homogeneity is endorsed by the demonstration of the first inkjet-printed perovskite laser device. Further, this inkjet printing process allows building highly reproducible perovskite solar cells with efficiencies up to 15%, by controlling the crystallisation dynamics. Fundamental research on the fabricated devices helped us to strain the bottleneck of high efficient printed perovskite layers. Our ongoing research focuses on the deeper understanding of the film formation during the printing and drying process, connecting the ink composition to the crystallization dynamics of the later film. These studies will enrich the field of highly scalable inkjet-printed thin film solar cells.
    12:15
    Inkjet-printed perovskite photovoltaics: From laboratory to industry
    Saule Technologies
    Perovskite technology is under dynamic development within the last few years. In 2013, perovskite solar cells have been nominated to be one of the top 10 scientific breakthroughs of the year by “Science” magazine. Their efficiency is already on par with silicon cells and is predicted to increase in the following years. Utilising inkjet printing technique enables the design of freeform perovskite solar modules. The presentation will highlight how flexible, lightweight and low-cost perovskite solar cells can boost solar energy harvesting and open new possibilities for photovoltaic applications in a variety of industries.
    12:45
    Pharmaceutical inkjet printing: Dream or reality?
    Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf
    In the last ten years, inkjet printing turned into the focus of the pharmaceutical research. Thereby, the interest did not increase in the well-established printing of packaging and package inserts, but in the inkjet printing of active pharmaceutical agents onto different dosage forms. The reason for that is especially the possibility to print individualised dosages of drugs and on demand manufacturing. Until now, there are many good concepts but as well many gaps to fill. This talk outlines what inkjet printing does with tablets, orodispersible films and capsules and how this technology can be established in the pharmaceutical sector. Furthermore, the opportunities and challenges of producing drug-loaded inks and substrates of sufficient pharmaceutical quality will be discussed. Until now, the pharmaceutical inkjet printing was only a non-continuous manufacturing process, now first in-line processes have been introduced. Recent progress, including the continuous operation, by our working group will be presented.
    13:15
    LUNCH AND TABLETOP NETWORKING
    14:30
    Mapping printhead jetting possibilities with dynamic ink properties
    iPrint Institute
    The goal of this research is to offer a cartography of jetting capacities of printheads for commercially available inks. The fluid mapping tools can predict if an ink will jet or not and the best operating jetting temperature for the given system by simply performing quick complex rheological tests using a piezo axial vibrator. The boundary conditions defining the jettability are given by measurements done on model fluids and inks. The mapping tool is developed correlating complex dynamic properties and in-flight drop visualizations on commercially available inks and model fluids. It incorporates parameters such as pumping capacity, high frequency viscosity and dynamic surface tension. The pumping capacity of an ink encompasses its high frequency viscoelastic response at the waveform conditions. The ability to store energy in the ink through its elastic module is key to eject a drop. All those parameters are measured for a wide range of temperatures.
    15:00
    Modelling and simulation of flow-induced damage to polymers during printing
    University of Cambridge
    New applications of additive manufacturing such as printed electronics, bioprinting and printed biopharmaceuticals have drawn the attention of industries and scientists to the development of specialised inks. However, there is a gap in the fundamental understanding of how the properties and functions of these materials can survive the harsh environment of large-scale industrial processes that were not originally designed for such purposes. This problem involves complex couplings between molecular motions and mechanics, fluid-solid interfaces and process scale flows. Our work focuses on a multiscale modelling and simulation framework aimed at quantifying the damage imparted to high molecular weight polymers by the high strain rates of inkjet printing. This fundamental analysis is translated into CFD tools that open up new opportunities for printhead design and ink formulation.
    15:30
    Multi-material inkjet printing: Core element in an automated hybrid process chain for production of individual electrical microsystems
    Fraunhofer IPA
    Application based individualisation, miniaturisation as well as a high functional density are major requirements for newly developed microelectronic and -mechatronic systems. Conventional manufacturing methods are limited regarding lot size and geometric freedom. A hybrid process chain based on a multi-material inkjet process in combination with other manufacturing processes could overcome these restrictions. We present the realisation of a modular process chain consisting of: multi-material inkjet printing, dispensing and microassembly, drying and curing, and quality and inspection. Multi-material inkjet printing is the key enabler in the presented process chain. It allows the production of highly complex isolating polymer structures and integration of conductive parts inside a 3D-printed part and the encapsulation of discrete SMD parts. Capabilities and challenges of the presented machine and process are demonstrated by means of test structures.
    16:00
    COFFEE BREAK AND TABLETOP NETWORKING
    16:30
    Optimising the printing image: Analysis of the ink and substrate surface properties under inkjet conditions
    Dataphysics
    Compatibility of ink and substrate is crucial for an optimal printed image. Currently in inkjet printing, the ink must be adjusted to each printhead and then precisely formulated for the printing process. Consequently, the only degree of freedom for desired print image lies in the properties of the substrate’s surface. By choosing a proper substrate or modifying it, according to its surface free energy, the required wettability and adhesion properties can be obtained; sometimes even without any primer or additional sealing process, which reduces production costs. Further to wetting and adhesion, the absorption process on absorbent substrates has an influence on the final image quality. With the optical contour analysing system OCA 200, we analysed the wettability of different raw and modified substrates by contact angle measurements and determined their surface free energy. With this knowledge it was possible to estimate wetting and adhesion behaviour of inks. Using the picodrop dosing system PDDS together with the OCA 200, we furthermore observed the ink-substrate interaction directly under inkjet drop dispensing conditions. We could determine contact angle changes due to absorption and wetting with a speed of up to 1 ms. As small quantities of ink (~100 µl) already allow the evaluation of thousands of drops with the PDDS it can easily be used for early stage printing tests of newly developed ink formulations with conditions similar to the inkjet process and thus without the risk of printhead blockage. These measurements enable fast and reliable determination of the surface properties of substrates and inks which finally simplifies the choice of substrate-ink combination for ideal image printing. Selected examples will be presented within this talk.
    17:00
    Advantage of dissolved oxygen (DO) and total dissolved gas (TDG) measurement in the lab and online on board of the printer
    UMS
    Filtration and degasification are key technology requirements for digital printing. Finer resolution and higher printing speed as well as changing ink chemistries and substrates are the challenging factors of today. Controlling of further parameters like dissolved oxygen becomes more important. Special inks and binders are oxygen “consuming” due to chemical reactions. Hereby standard measurement with DO sensors will give you too low readings concerning the total amount of gas in these liquids. UMS developed the first total dissolved gas (TDG) sensor for the printing industry. This presentation will provide an overview of the filtration and degassing methodology and technology on board of digital ink jet printers, including specific product type recommendations and how to ensure keeping parameters under control.
    17:30
    Inkjet droplet measurement with laser diagnostics
    Dantec Dynamics
    New emerging industrial applications in inkjet printing as for example printed electronics, OLED display printing or printing of sensors, entail new challenges for process control and calibration of printing systems. Accurate measurement of each single droplet is the key to meet the new challenges. With PDA (Phase Doppler Anemometry), a new laser measurement method is introduced that provides several advantages, for example the extreme fine resolution and ultra-high measurement speed which enables a real-time monitoring of high frequency droplet for higher quality printing results and save costs. The method is detailed by showing results of a demo measurement of an inkjet printing process on a micro-drop printing device.
    18:00
    Prediction of open nozzle times for volatile inks by meniscus motion analysis
    iPrint Institute
    Many inkjet printing machines that are printing volatile inks are operating in ambient conditions that require nozzle maintenance in certain intervals to ensure reliable operation of the printheads. The maximum time in which ink inside nozzles can be exposed to ambient conditions before they cannot be recovered by jetting, is called the open nozzle time. The open nozzle time can be determined empirically by performing repeatedly nozzle maintenance followed by printing after an increasing delay. Determining the open nozzle time empirically is however time consuming, and with certain inks there is a risk to damage the printhead or intense cleaning is required if the ink dried in the nozzles too much. A relatively simple solution to efficiently estimate the open nozzle time without risking damaging the printhead can be a meniscus motion analysis. Thereby the jets are excited with pulses that do not create droplets and the peak excitation of the meniscus, which is the liquid interface at the nozzles, is measured. As, due to drying of the ink, viscosity increases, the peak meniscus excitation is decreasing over time accordingly. By measuring the peak excitation over time, the open nozzle time can be extrapolated without having to wait until the ink is already dried too much for jetting.
    19:00
    NETWORKING DINNER
  • DAY 2 - Track 1 (17.10.2018)

    Time Topic
    09:00
    CONFERENCE INTRODUCTION
    09:15
    PLENARY SESSION: Continuous Inkjet printing for packaging and industrial applications
    Kodak
    Packaging and industrial applications are demanding shorter run lengths, personalisation and better supply chain efficiency. Now, with Continuous Inkjet technologies, packaging producers can use digital print at high speeds and resolution, using economical and environmentally friendly water-based nano-particulate pigment inks to produce high quality flexible packaging. Explore the trends for these applications and the technical advantages of Continuous Inkjet using a combination of pretreatments, water-based inks and drying solutions that enable the mainstream production of flexible packaging printing.
    09:45
    PLENARY SESSION: Powerdrop: making ink stick
    Archipelago Technology
    From armchairs to automobiles, adhesives lie at the heart of modern manufacturing and yet the ways in which we apply them are often messy, wasteful, slow or imprecise. We heard customer demands for a technology that would enable the precision jetting of hot melt adhesives and in response Archipelago delivered the Powerdrop process. Powerdrop enables the jetting of adhesive and a myriad of other functional materials which have traditionally been too hard to handle, too volatile or too viscous for inkjet heads. In this talk you will hear about Powerdrop, about Archipelago’s latest technological developments in jetting adhesive and the market opportunities that printing shaped adhesive is opening.
    10:15
    PLENARY SESSION: New printheads from Konica Minolta
    Industrial Inkjet
    Konica Minolta produces a very wide range of inkjet printheads that are used throughout the inkjet industry in a large number of applications. Konica Minolta is continuously developing new printheads and at TheIJC we will announce a new Konica Minolta product family. The talk will also include an update on development work in one or two new market segments.
    10:45
    COFFEE BREAK AND TABLETOP NETWORKING
    11:15
    Peeling the inkjet onion: Nozzle out detection and compensation
    Meteor Inkjet
    Detecting and dealing with printhead nozzle failure is a hot topic in the industrial inkjet industry. Peeling back the inkjet onion allows the issue to be understood and addressed. Detection of, and on-the-fly image correction for, suboptimal nozzle states is a particular challenge for high-speed, single pass printing. Real-world applications of various approaches will form the basis of this talk including a high-level review of methods, the hardware and software technology required, and implications for system builders.
    11:45
    Key success factors for inkjet integration projects
    Hapa
    The inkjet technology has increased its application range steadily over the years. It is found today in a variety of different areas such as commercial, tile and décor, textile, direct-to-object printing and many more. But what is crucial when integrating inkjet printing technology? What should be considered, when running such projects? This presentation looks at key aspects to be considered and gives practical recommendations for (new) UV DOD inkjet application projects. Hapa supports inkjet integration projects with their products and expertise covering the full range of disciplines such as mechanical, electrical and software engineering, application engineering, prepress, ink development and ink production.
    12:15
    Is this the end for spray coating?
    Cyan Tec
    Spray coating of industrial hard-coats for plastics in automotive trim and other industries is established technology. This technology can waste up to 80% of the materials they spray. The layer thickness is difficult to control. Cyan Tec Systems are pioneering the use of inkjet to replace spray coatings in the automotive sector. Using single pass inkjet systems sometimes allied with robotics, Cyan Tec are applying hard-coats to areas precisely where needed without masking. Using this technology, waste of material is cut from up to 80% to zero, solvent emissions are reduced by up to 80% and excellent control of layer thickness and edge control can be established. The technology is suitable for interior and exterior automotive plastics and offers huge potential for other materials and market sectors. Is this the end for spray coating?
    12:45
    LUNCH AND TABLETOP NETWORKING
    14:00
    Designing pumps into ink supply systems
    KNF
    This presentation will explain which factors must be considered in the design of pumps for functions such as recirculation, degassing, supply/replenishment or meniscus control. Topics such as pressure pulses, material compatibility, diaphragm life, hours of operation, as well as electronic control signals will be addressed.
    14:30
    New advances in measurement and quantification of inkjet performance
    ImageXpert
    Development of high quality inkjet inks and waveforms, both for functional and decorative applications, requires state-of-the-art characterisation equipment and techniques. To optimise the ink itself, as well as jetting conditions and waveform, it is vital to understand how the developed ink behaves upon ejection from the printhead, when landing onto the substrate of choice and after curing. We will introduce methods to measure ink, waveform, and substrate performance, using real-world data and images from several automatic sweeping and analysis tools which have not previously been presented including automatic waveform sweeps, drop tracking and sustainability data. We will also show and discuss high-resolution imaging tool for head autopsy, which can show a “stitched” image of nozzles across a head. We will also provide a brief survey of other key equipment that makes up a test printing rig, including drop watcher, ink supply, printhead, print controller, mist extractor and belt or linear stage for creating test and sample prints.
    15:00
    Handling inks in inkjet systems: Main requirements for liquid pumps
    Gardner Denver Thomas
    Pumping inks within an inkjet system is at the core of every drop-on-demand or continuous inkjet printer. Pumps support inkjet systems in achieving the highest possible uptime as well as ensuring great print quality by maintaining the ink composition and transferring inks gently to the printheads. Find out in this presentation how significant strides in pump reliability engineering can help bringing printers to market faster, and how to choose the right pump type for different requirements.
    15:30
    COFFEE BREAK AND TABLETOP NETWORKING
    16:00
    Adhesion of inkjet inks: Pain or gain?
    ChemStream
    Although inkjet printing is a well-known technology and the formulation of inkjet inks can be already mastered, adhesion of inks to different substrates remains still as the holy grail. Nowadays, the biggest challenge is to obtain inks that would adhere directly to a myriad of types of substrates. Hence, something that in principle seems so trivial becomes the most difficult part of an inkjet formulation. At ChemStream we have been developing a thorough research of commercial as well as tailor-made adhesion promoters in order to pinpoint a specific solution for every customer requirement. This lecture will give insights over how monomers and adhesion promoters could be wisely chosen in order to obtain the perfect adhesion on the perfect substrate.
    16:30
    An inkjet head does not make a printer
    NTS Group
    Clients see the advantage of using inkjet printing for an application. They have no experience with inkjet printing itself and ask players in the field (head manufacturers, UV light vendors, ink suppliers etc.) for their knowledge and contribution. These contributions are highly valuable but lack the overall view. This presentation is about the pitfalls introducing inkjet printing within an organisation. It provides explanation and examples of overcoming these pitfalls but even more to achieve a development environment where people work together towards a goal.
    17:00
    BEST SPEAKER AWARDS
  • DAY 2 - Track 2 (17.10.2018)

    Time Topic
    09:00
    CONFERENCE INTRODUCTION
    09:15
    PLENARY SESSION: Continuous Inkjet printing for packaging and industrial applications
    Kodak
    Packaging and industrial applications are demanding shorter run lengths, personalisation and better supply chain efficiency. Now, with Continuous Inkjet technologies, packaging producers can use digital print at high speeds and resolution, using economical and environmentally friendly water-based nano-particulate pigment inks to produce high quality flexible packaging. Explore the trends for these applications and the technical advantages of Continuous Inkjet using a combination of pretreatments, water-based inks and drying solutions that enable the mainstream production of flexible packaging printing.
    09:45
    PLENARY SESSION: Powerdrop: making ink stick
    Archipelago Technology
    From armchairs to automobiles, adhesives lie at the heart of modern manufacturing and yet the ways in which we apply them are often messy, wasteful, slow or imprecise. We heard customer demands for a technology that would enable the precision jetting of hot melt adhesives and in response Archipelago delivered the Powerdrop process. Powerdrop enables the jetting of adhesive and a myriad of other functional materials which have traditionally been too hard to handle, too volatile or too viscous for inkjet heads. In this talk you will hear about Powerdrop, about Archipelago’s latest technological developments in jetting adhesive and the market opportunities that printing shaped adhesive is opening.
    10:15
    PLENARY SESSION: New printheads from Konica Minolta
    Industrial Inkjet
    Konica Minolta produces a very wide range of inkjet printheads that are used throughout the inkjet industry in a large number of applications. Konica Minolta is continuously developing new printheads and at TheIJC we will announce a new Konica Minolta product family. The talk will also include an update on development work in one or two new market segments.
    10:45
    COFFEE BREAK AND TABLETOP NETWORKING
    11:15
    Breakthrough technologies for maximised UV LED output consistency and control
    Phoseon
    UV LED light sources deliver extremely stable and controlled UV output compared to traditional mercury arc lamps. They provide very consistent curing results and accomplish life spans of several ten thousand hours of operation, making UV LED especially well-suited for critical applications. Some printing applications, especially in electronics and display manufacturing, but also in low migration print processes for food packaging only allow for tight process windows. However, especially with air cooled UV LED light sources, thermal effects and some degradation over lifetime lead to variations in UV output. Eliminating these effects requires several techniques, which have only become available quite recently. Additionally, some applications by legislation or customer internal quality regulations require a regular consistency and performance monitoring to ensure only safe products find their way to the end user. This is a challenging, and often virtually impossible task, which now is addressed with a new technical approach.
    11:45
    UV LED curing: Extreme precision and wavelengths below 300 nm
    Excelitas
    UV LED technology enables us much more than successfully replacing the mercury lamp solutions, and therefore gaining reduced operational costs through longer lifetime, reduced electrical con-sumption, higher reliability and reduced heating of substrates. Additionally, we will discuss how UV LED overcome the limitations shown by today commercially available wavelengths. Post exposure to 278 nm UV LEDs is an attractive solution that is investigated in greater depth to explore irradi-ance, dose and wavelength requirements for industrial curing solutions. In addition, the feasibility of adding deep-UV LEDs into a commercial LED curing system is discussed and a practical approach of such UVC LED lamp is shown. During the first experimental trials with various partners, we have achieved or overachieved the expectation with the following formulations: clear coatings on metal packages (tubes, cans, etc); pigmented inks and white colours for printing (flexo, offset); overprint varnishes for flexo and offset print; glossy surface at inkjet print; wood coatings and various mix-ture of resins and PI for different applications.
    12:15
    Hybrid UV: Is it really all UV-LED?
    Integration Technology
    While UV-LED curing is becoming the ideal standard in the fast moving inkjet market the reality for UV curing in today and tomorrow’s commercial environment is that there are still hurdles and challenges for pure LED installations. Hybrid UV is a combination of UV curing technologies that are an answer to some of the technical challenges faced in the business of developing inkjet applications and moving inkjet into new markets. Together we will have a look at the benefits of combined technologies as well as some other possibilities and options Hybrid UV can provide to get the perfect result or even open new business opportunities. In addition recent developments in low energy, environmentally friendly, non LED sources in shorter wavelengths extend options even further.
    12:45
    LUNCH AND TABLETOP NETWORKING
    14:00
    Small and large format multipass printers: Alive and kicking with semi-industrial applications
    Marabu
    Single pass has long been a hot topic in inkjet. It has been seen as the answer to industrial applications. However, this is not the only option with Marabu’s industrial ink and application experience – we have successful projects incorporating standard printers with these applications. End customers have for a long time have been using standard multi-pass machines for a variety of non-graphic applications. Now printer manufacturers are actively developing printers with semi-industrial applications in mind this widens the possibilities even further. We discuss this interesting angle in the small and large Format market and the applications and challenges from an ink and machine perspective.
    14:30
    Key success factors for developing and commercialising a successful aqueous inkjet product: A specialist point of view vs. a generalist perspective
    Fujifilm Inkjet Technology
    There are many different ways to measure the degree of success of a new product entering the market. At an absolute minimum a successful product has to meet the techno-commercial targets and requirements within the context of its intended application. When considering what constitutes a successful product, it is important to recognise that the "printing process" consists of a series of equally important, highly complex and interrelated unit operations, starting from the print surface preparation to post print finishing and route to market. A review of the major aqueous markets is given with examples from a specialist point of view for the individual aforementioned unit operations as well as a generalist perspective for the right alignment and interrelation of those unit operations. FUJIFILM InkJet Technology is uniquely positioned to contribute to the ongoing development of future applications of inkjet printing at many different levels.
    15:00
    aNIR: Enabler for pre/post inkjet processing
    Adphos
    Contactless media application technologies, especially like inkjet printing/coating processes require at minimum post application treatment of the generated media droplets at the surface. In a lot of cases, like for plastic substrates, textiles and for some application technologies even a pretreatment is mandatory for a successful printing/coating process. In this presentation, a brief description of the aNIR-systems technology is given, focusing on the special benefits compared with today’s other drying, thermal process treatment systems. The wide range aNIR-application potential, especially outside the graphical printing application like packaging, printed electronics, direct print to shape on 3 dimensional structures and industrial coating applications and even additive manufacturing, will be demonstrated on realised application reference.
    15:30
    COFFEE BREAK AND TABLETOP NETWORKING
    16:00
    First experimental study using a novel device for characterising drop formation, drop substrate interaction, and waveform optimisation
    Krüss
    Whereas, in our well received presentation at TheIJC 2017 we focused on the ink-substrate interplay and the ink surface tension, we will here focus on drop formation and printhead waveform optimisation. We briefly review the theoretical concepts of drop formation before we present an educational experimental study on various inks and model fluids using the novel KRÜSS DSA Inkjet instrument. The DSA Inkjet facilitates a continuous observation of the formation and flight of drops ejected by commercially available printheads. Printhead waveforms can be easily modified and possible resulting changes on drop formation are monitored instantaneously. By using model fluids with differently set viscosities or surface tensions, we illustrate the interplay of those two fluid parameters and the printhead waveform. Finally, we highlight how the DSA Inkjet facilitates a fast and reliable waveform optimisation of various inks using only small amounts of ink.
    16:30
    PowerHeat! The power of NIR drying in the digital printing market
    Lambda Technology
    The presentation shows the interaction between media and ink in the application process, as well as the connection between energy input and drying processes. It explains how drying should be built in different environments and explain the technical benefits of NIR (Near-infrared) in the complete spectrum of drying processes. The integration possibilities of NIR are shown, together with the high energy saving possibilities of this technology.
    17:00
    BEST SPEAKER AWARDS
  • DAY 2 - Track 3 (17.10.2018)

    Time Topic
    09:00
    CONFERENCE INTRODUCTION
    09:15
    PLENARY SESSION: Continuous Inkjet printing for packaging and industrial applications
    Kodak
    Packaging and industrial applications are demanding shorter run lengths, personalisation and better supply chain efficiency. Now, with Continuous Inkjet technologies, packaging producers can use digital print at high speeds and resolution, using economical and environmentally friendly water-based nano-particulate pigment inks to produce high quality flexible packaging. Explore the trends for these applications and the technical advantages of Continuous Inkjet using a combination of pretreatments, water-based inks and drying solutions that enable the mainstream production of flexible packaging printing.
    09:45
    PLENARY SESSION: Powerdrop: making ink stick
    Archipelago Technology
    From armchairs to automobiles, adhesives lie at the heart of modern manufacturing and yet the ways in which we apply them are often messy, wasteful, slow or imprecise. We heard customer demands for a technology that would enable the precision jetting of hot melt adhesives and in response Archipelago delivered the Powerdrop process. Powerdrop enables the jetting of adhesive and a myriad of other functional materials which have traditionally been too hard to handle, too volatile or too viscous for inkjet heads. In this talk you will hear about Powerdrop, about Archipelago’s latest technological developments in jetting adhesive and the market opportunities that printing shaped adhesive is opening.
    10:15
    PLENARY SESSION: New printheads from Konica Minolta
    Industrial Inkjet
    Konica Minolta produces a very wide range of inkjet printheads that are used throughout the inkjet industry in a large number of applications. Konica Minolta is continuously developing new printheads and at TheIJC we will announce a new Konica Minolta product family. The talk will also include an update on development work in one or two new market segments.
    10:45
    COFFEE BREAK AND TABLETOP NETWORKING
    11:15
    Inkjet analysis by light scattering in the printing gap
    iPrint Institute
    One major problem when using standard drop watching equipment for optimisation and analysis of a printing machine is transferability of the results. Often, printing problems that need to be solved on a machine cannot be observed on a drop watching system, as it does not sufficiently represent the print machine. The best way to solve technical problems related to the printing process is to do analysis on the print machine directly. With certain limitations regarding optical distance, sharpness and resolution, it is possible to do a drop watching analysis during the printing process in the printing gap. One solution for in printing gap drop analysis with a redirected camera optics and LED backlight was presented by iPrint at TheIJC 2015. Dependent on the print machine design, backlight illumination is however not always suitable or even possible. In this presentation, a solution for backlight free drop analysis with increased measurement quality using light scattering to illuminate drops is presented.
    11:45
    Functional inkjet printing on 3D-objects
    Fraunhofer ENAS
    In the recent years the scope for digital inkjet printing was enlarged with technologies for printing on non-planar objects like bottles and smaller objects like helmets or footballs of different shape and size but also on even larger objects like airplanes. For the graphics industry the aim is to add information and complex graphical printings to the curved surfaces without using labels and the advantage to have more design options for the mass customisation market. Besides printing graphics technology driven markets, industries like automotive or aviation are looking forward for printing functionalities directly on their 3D parts to realise e.g. individualised wire harness or lighting elements. For the realisation of such digital manufacturing processes the digital Inkjet printing technology is an ideal candidate. In detail inkjet printing can be used to apply functional material like electrical insulating, semi conducting and conducting inks onto 3D objects to build up electronic components. With this presentation the latest results of inkjet-printed and post-cured conductive paths on 3D objects will be presented.
    12:15
    Understanding ceramic inkjet inks for glass: Ink formulations, process rheology and print defects
    TriModal
    This paper presents challenges in developing ceramic inkjet ink for glass which comprises frit and inorganic pigment as main functional components. Physical properties alone are no guide to ink performance. Small variations in ink viscoelasticity influence upstream flow dynamics and jet break-up mechanism downstream. We will present an overview of ink formulation, how and where individual ink components influence the jetting behaviour during printing. We will present novel rheological tools capable of quantifying complex fluid rheology of low viscosity inkjet inks at conditions similar to those during printing. We will discuss the influence of individual components and ink as-a-whole on dynamic flow behaviour in-channel, nozzle, in-flight during printing, which is vital to control print quality (drop ejection characteristic, reliability). We will also highlight printing defects associated with high impact drop on non-absorbing substrates. These techniques provide useful tools to differentiate between apparently identical inks but that show different jetting behaviour.
    12:45
    LUNCH AND TABLETOP NETWORKING
    14:00
    Physical analysis of ink-radiation interaction in drying processes
    Heraeus Noblelight
    Delivery of heat to a drying system is critical and can be accomplished in several ways. Beside convention in hot air dryer, hybrid radiant heating or drying involves a heat transfer by radiation between a hot element and a material at lower temperature that needs to be heated or dried. The peak wavelength of the radiation is dependent of the temperature of the heated element. The optical properties (specially absorption) of ink are also very different depending on the structure or colour of ink. The simultaneous drying of black-yellow ink is still challenging. We have measured the heating rates of different types of water-based inks under various wavelengths, from 750-5000 nm and compared drying behaviour. Additionally, we found that for special types of emitters the heating rate of yellow and black is comparable.
    14:30
    How to evaluate your filtration and degassing processes for your digital inkjet ink
    Pall
    Filtration and degasification are key technology requirements for digital printing. The evaluation of these processes could be complex due to different influencing factors but are critical for success. This talk gives an overview of procedures developed by Pall and other supporting tools available to determine ideal process solutions. The benefits of combining different tools will be explained by different examples.
    15:00
    Filtration and particle size analysis: Why these techniques must to be utilised together
    PSS/Soliton
    Many processes utilise filtration at some stage. In general, most filtrations are performed with the belief that filters fully remove particles over a stated particle size. For some applications, this assumption may be satisfactory to ensure a usable product, but for inkjet inks and printing, this assumption may lead to defective products which can result in nozzle clogging and production losses. There are a number of particle size analysis techniques currently available, but some perform differently from others, rendering them less suitable for a particular application. This presentation will provide a brief overview of particle sizing techniques available and examine the pros and cons of those techniques when employed in the analysis of products, both pre- and post-filtration. Examples of samples of ink measurements will be presented demonstrating the efficiency of filtration on these products.
    15:30
    COFFEE BREAK AND TABLETOP NETWORKING
    16:00
    Understanding UV LED lifetime
    Hammamatsu
    The utilisation of UV LED modules is a new “state-of-the-art” curing technology which will replace metal halide lamps in many printing applications. Since UV LEDs suffer from aging effects as any other light source, and since stable output power is a key factor for obtaining reliable curing results, a profound knowledge of LED lifetime and aging is essential. This presentation is focused on the aging characteristics of UV LEDs and the influence of the operation conditions of the modules. In addition, the impact of the ambient environment is addressed. Finally, the possibility to evaluate the lifetime of UV LED systems using UV power meters is explained.
    16:30
    Inks for ceramic decoration and the full digital goal
    CNR-ISTEC
    In the last years, the inkjet printing technique has completely upset the concept of ceramic tiles decoration in terms of application methodology, but mainly for colours preparation. The high resolution that can be achieved with an even lowered pigment content gives the possibility to get better results reducing importantly materials costs. Starting from the results already obtained in terms of technology improvements, the current hot topic is the possibility to fully convert the traditional ceramic decoration line to a full digital process. To achieve this result, several issues are still to be solved. In fact, the digital application of ceramic glasses and effects requires the capability to manage high solid content. For this particular application, other than in case of traditional ceramic inks, the stability of the colloidal suspensions and their rheological behaviour must be studied and optimised. Furthermore, the amount and kind of gaseous pollutant emitted during firing must be strictly limited in order to achieve a greener industrial process. It must be subjoined that the really important and innovative goal is a whole transition from an organic based inks system to a water-based one, leading to dramatically reducing the environmental impact of the decoration lines. Under this aspect, the research on the perfect ink formulation set a lot of open question regarding pigment and inks stability.
    17:00
    BEST SPEAKER AWARDS
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Next InkJet Conference

TheIJC 2019 
29-30 October 2019
Düsseldorf/Neuss, Germany

About Us

TheIJC is an ESMA event - ESMA is a leading non-profit European association for printing manufacturers in screen, digital and flexo technology.

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