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TheIJC.com - The 6th European edition of The Inkjet Conference - Düsseldorf, 29 - 30 October 2019.    Buy Tickets Now

Programme

TheIJC2019agendaoverview

  • DAY 1 - Track 1 (29.10.2019)

    Time Topic    
    09:00
    CONFERENCE INTRODUCTION
       
    09:15
    PLENARY SESSION: Developing a modular inkjet printing system for industrial printing
    Memjet
      A combination of modularity, flexibility, and a systems approach are enabling OEMs to develop printing solutions quickly. This presentation will describe how a full featured modular system can allow OEMs and end users to develop printing solutions quickly and at low cost. As users demand more and more customisation to fit their application, the DuraLink system demonstrates an approach to building print systems that allow application specific systems to be built quickly. Examples of the variety of designs possible and speed to create systems will be shared.
    09:45
    PLENARY SESSION: TBA
    Ricoh
      TBA
    10:15
    PLENARY SESSION: Solutions to enable high image quality in inkjet printing
    Xaar
      New markets, applications and their printing demands are now driving higher levels of print quality and the requirement to maintain it under more and more difficult conditions. Single-pass printers have limited capability to hide colour variations and defects compared with that of multi-pass, scanning printers. The ability to provide colour consistency is key to digital growth in many of the new markets and in some, any degree of non-uniformity is considered a barrier. In this presentation, Jesus Garcia, Chief Architect at Xaar, will talk about some of the current techniques already employed in applications and some of the newer options now available to enable digital inkjet to deliver high print quality.
    10:45
    PLENARY SESSION: Making printhead jettability wider
    Seiko Instruments
      TBA
    11:15
    NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK
       
    11:45
    A system's approach to creating high quality output: The importance of an Image Quality System
    Kodak
      Inkjet printing technologies rely on systems approach to drive high quality output. One of the key elements of this approach is the Image Quality System (IQS). Kodak’s IQS builds upon Kodak’s learnings and know-how of data handling to analyze images and apply real-time data correction which is used daily around the world, producing billions of saleable images yearly. The IQS approach involves 6 significant functions: Automated Registration Setup, Density Calibration, Stitching, Color-to-Color Registration, Page Correlation and Front to Back Registration; all which occur while printing at speeds up to 1000 fpm. The core competency of Kodak’s EISD team include image correction algorithms and image capture analysis which is automated, and yields results in image quality that the commercial print industry demands.
    12:15
    Streaming print data directly to printhead electronics
    Global Graphics Software
      Sending print data directIy to the printhead electronics makes it possible to achieve blistering speeds even with variable data when every item is different. Can you maintain optimum quality too? The benefit is significantly improved productivity because you can keep presses running with no waiting time. Tom Mooney discusses recent technical breakthroughs and describes how the answer lies in a software engine that can obtain blistering speeds by driving data directly to the electronics whilst correcting for common quality defects.
    12:45
    Overcoming challenges surrounding colour management in digital tile decoration through new approaches
    ColorGATE
      Conventional measuring techniques as well as measuring instruments and the classical colour management approach often lead to unsatisfactory results and problems in decorative applications, such as ceramics. In this presentation, a different approach will be introduced that focuses more on characterising the design than the print system and overcomes the problems of traditional measuring instruments on difficult surfaces. This leads not only to more flexibility through easy line and print system changes for producing a design, but also to significantly reduced costs through faster line entries in the course of reproductions.
    13:15
    NETWORKING LUNCH
       
    14:30
    The JetFlow: Ink supply module for high-circulating printheads
    NTS Group
      In recent years, several markets (e.g. packaging) are adopting digital technologies to print variable data which is pushing Inkjet technology to achieve high speed (> 100 m/min) with high quality images (1,200 dpi). This induces challenges with respect to high flow rate for the ink module system capable of delivering to multiple printheads. This presentation elaborates on the modular and software configurable ink delivery system to achieve high speed printing.
    15:00
    Customising pumps for inkjet systems regarding performance and chemical requirements
    Gardner Denver Thomas
      The presentation shows how flexibility in pump design can help to hit performance requirements in ink handling, for example in pump applications like ink degassing, meniscus pressure control or ink recirculation. It furthermore focuses on chemical compatibility of diaphragm pumps with a variety of ink types by looking into different thermoplastic and elastomeric materials suitable different ink types like aqueous, solvent-based or UV inks.
    15:30
    Extending pump life by design
    Diener Precision Pumps
      Gone are the days when replacement parts are a reliable part of an OEM business model. Competitive pressure and customer sensitivity to downtime have increased the importance of long-life components. In fluidics machines the pump drives the entire system, but by its very nature has a limited life. In this presentation we will explore the design aspects which affect life in inkjet applications, highlighting the methods utilised to keep the pump from being a life-limiting component. Various aspects will be discussed including hydrostatic bearings, working with hard pigments and the importance of engineer-to-engineer interface during the design phase.
    16:00
    NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK
       
    16:30
    What's new in UV LED
    Phoseon
      The presentation focuses on new developments in UV LED including convection cooling, multiwavelength and UVC. It will explain why the outputs of all 16W LED systems are not the same, as well as compare packaged LED arrays with RAW LEDs and PWM with constant current output. Furthermore, it will demonstrate how to make an air cooled LED system like a water cooled system – with a consistent output. The importance of the chase for more power and intensity will be shown, along with the reliability tests for LED systems. Finally, the interaction between the “internet of things” and UV LED will be discussed.
    17:00
    Has UV LED technology come of age?
    Integration Technology
      This paper will chart the meteoric rise of UV LED curing in inkjet applications and detail the technology developments that have supported this; outline the ‘state of the art’ while considering current challenges; and finally detail potential roadmaps both in terms of applications and future technology developments.
    17:30
    Understanding and optimising screeners
    Global Inkjet Systems
      The screener can be a significant proportion of the processor load when rendering for print, so it is important to understand the options available for your application. This presentation will review error diffusion and ordered dither screeners and discuss the differences and capabilities. It will also discuss the impact of recent processor improvements on screener performance.
    18:00
    How to attract and keep the best talent in inkjet
    Profile Recruitment
      What does the best talent look like? To many companies it is someone with experience, knowledge of the market, excellent customer skills, etc. Therefore many companies in inkjet are potentially looking for the same types of profile. Knowledge on inkjet and engineering, experience of formulating inks, someone who understands waveforms, sounds familiar? So the next question is how are you differentiating yourself from the competition? Are you attracting the best people into your organisation? Come and listen to this informative presentation which will share some top tips on how to attract the best people to your business and more importantly how to keep them from leaving. This is more relevant than ever with a shortage of skills across the market – it’s now time to sharpen our tools.
    19:00
    NETWORKING DINNER
       
  • DAY 1 - Track 2 (29.10.2019)

    Time Topic
    09:00
    CONFERENCE INTRODUCTION
    09:15
    PLENARY SESSION: Developing a modular inkjet printing system for industrial printing
    Memjet
    A combination of modularity, flexibility, and a systems approach are enabling OEMs to develop printing solutions quickly. This presentation will describe how a full featured modular system can allow OEMs and end users to develop printing solutions quickly and at low cost. As users demand more and more customisation to fit their application, the DuraLink system demonstrates an approach to building print systems that allow application specific systems to be built quickly. Examples of the variety of designs possible and speed to create systems will be shared.
    09:45
    PLENARY SESSION: TBC
    Ricoh
    TBC
    10:15
    PLENARY SESSION: Solutions to enable high image quality in inkjet printing
    Xaar
    New markets, applications and their printing demands are now driving higher levels of print quality and the requirement to maintain it under more and more difficult conditions. Single-pass printers have limited capability to hide colour variations and defects compared with that of multi-pass, scanning printers. The ability to provide colour consistency is key to digital growth in many of the new markets and in some, any degree of non-uniformity is considered a barrier. In this presentation, Jesus Garcia, Chief Architect at Xaar, will talk about some of the current techniques already employed in applications and some of the newer options now available to enable digital inkjet to deliver high print quality.
    10:45
    PLENARY SESSION: Making printhead jettability wider
    Seiko Instruments
    TBC
    11:15
    NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK
    11:45
    Innovative formulation additives to improve your inkjet inks
    BASF
    Inkjet inks are a fast-growing market segment, successfully penetrating multiple application areas such as ceramics, packaging or textiles. This presentation gives insights in the wide latitude of technical capabilities including newest developments in the area of dispersing agents. Especially this group of products is highly important for high performance inkjet inks (wb/sb/UV). They ensure excellent stability without sedimentation or agglomeration of pigment particles and low viscosity of pigment concentrates and inks over a long period of time. Besides formulation additives the presentation will also give an overview about monomers and oligomers for UV-curable inks and in addition, about general raw materials for the water-based inkjet process.
    12:15
    Advanced resin technologies for inkjet packaging applications
    DSM
    TBC
    12:45
    Promoting curing speed: Ideal surfactants for LED curing inkjet inks
    Evonik
    Regardless whether flat bed, roll-to-roll or single pass, virtually every newly launched printer today utilises LED technology as an exclusive energy source for curing UV curable inkjet inks. Advancing printhead manufacture and integration technology support the increase in print and image quality, and faster production speeds enable inkjet to enter various application fields from packaging to flooring to textiles, etc. Like never before, surface active additives play an integral role in the formulation of LED curable inks. For example, acrylated silicone chemistry enables unparalleled support to ink formulations demanding fast-cure, reduced tack and anti-blocking of these formulations that suffer from oxygen inhibition.
    13:15
    NETWORKING LUNCH
    14:30
    A new reactive diluent for inkjet formulations? Why?
    BASF
    Along with the challenges of low viscosity, high reactivity and good adhesion to several substrates, many other factors play a role in choosing the right ingredients: regulatory pressure, easily handling, enhanced performances. The new commercially available BASF product for UV coatings and UV printing industry, Vinyl Methyl OXazolidinone, called VMOX, shows substantial technical improvements. In this presentation, the newly introduced functional vinyl monomer, VMOX, is compared with the state-of-the-art reactive diluents. Toxicological profiles, technical benefits, physical parameters (viscosity and melting points), along with colour brilliance and odour will be evaluated and discussed in some details to generate new opportunities in various applications, especially in UV inkjet printing.
    15:00
    New type of metallic pigment and the unique mechanism to achieve excellent specularity for inkjet printing
    Oike
    Usually, vacuum-deposited aluminium pigment is used to express metallic design as pigment for metallic ink. However, it is limited to indoor sign display, ornament and so on because aluminium doesn’t have sufficient stability against water. Therefore we developed a new metallic pigment which has remarkable water resistant ability and higher specularity. First, in order to select a candidate metal, we evaluated Gloss Unit (GU) for several vacuum-deposited metals on PET films and we focused a new metal which showed comparable values to aluminium. Then we prepared spin-coated and bar-coated samples to evaluate each specularity level and we found the particle characteristics of a new metal, for example particle shape and particle size distribution as factors which influenced higher specularity. Through our experiment data and consideration, we show the unique mechanism of a new metal and propose it as a new type of metallic pigment for inkjet printing.
    15:30
    Efficient dispersion systems and their impact on digital inks processing
    Netzsch
    Dispersion is not an easy process when talking about digital inks. Different aspects and parameters such as power, viscosity, type of pigments and their particle size, dispersants, surfactants, are relevant for final stabilisation of dispersion. But how to do it in the most efficient way will also depend on the type of equipment and its physical working principles. Shear forces, elongation, impact, turbulence, microcavitation are phenomenons to be evaluated. All these aspects will be reviewed in this presentation in order to select the most efficient dispersion system and prepare the product for further milling step and achieve highest quality demanding for actual digital inks.
    16:00
    NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK
    16:30
    Metamerism in décor application: An innovative approach for single-pass inkjet
    Toyo Ink
    Inkjet printing is encountering a growing interest from décor printers and manufacturers, but many inkjet users claim that metamerism remains a key point to be addressed. Proposing a solution that could be applied on existing printing systems is a way to allow for a faster adoption of inkjet printing in this industry. The presentation will explain an innovative approach for single-pass inkjet to address metamerism from an ink perspective. By showing the results that we could obtain on an industrial scale, we will explain how differently the conventional and inkjet inks react and which new solution was designed beyond the use of the same pigments as for conventional inks.
    17:00
    Inks for MEMS printheads: Challenges and opportunities
    Fujifilm Ink Solutions
    The latest generation silicon MEMS printheads offer a number of key advantages due to their ability to combine high resolution and jetting frequency with long life and wide ink compatibility. However the very characteristics that make these printheads so compelling present a range of challenges to ink developers. This presentation examines these charateristics, identifies the challenges, and offers some technical solutions that can help to unlock the potential of this important class of printheads./td>
    17:30
    Impact on polymerization of UV DOD inks using different UV LED unit designs
    Hapa
    This presentation covers the results of a UV LED unit benchmark that details the performance differences of UV LED units from different suppliers. The results relate to UV curing inkjet applications only and are not applicable for other printing technologies. All measurements were obtained using the same parameters for each LED unit. The results are not intended as a rating of different UV LED suppliers since requirements are application specific. The results demonstrate the importance of the process development required for optimal polymerization of UV curing inks.
    18:00
    Improved dye sublimation ink for textile printing and new UV-curable ink for rigid materials
    Print-Rite
    Dye sublimation inks are widely used in the textile industry which is very sensitive to print quality and at the same time under high price pressure. It is possible to reduce costs by using uncoated transfer paper but this should not have any impact on the quality of the printed textile. Deep investigations of Print-Rite made it possible to develop a dye sublimation ink, which offers even higher quality in the same time as reducing print cost. Key parameter of that improvement is the wetting behaviour of the ink on the transfer media. In this presentation the key effects are shown, the print quality is illustrated, and the cost advantage is explained. Furthermore, a new UV-curing ink set is introduced. The properties and print quality aspects of these new inks, which are especially suitable for rigid surfaces, are shown in many test results.
    19:00
    NETWORKING DINNER
  • DAY 1 - Track 3 (29.10.2019)

    Time Topic
    09:00
    CONFERENCE INTRODUCTION
    09:15
    PLENARY SESSION: Developing a modular inkjet printing system for industrial printing
    Memjet
    A combination of modularity, flexibility, and a systems approach are enabling OEMs to develop printing solutions quickly. This presentation will describe how a full featured modular system can allow OEMs and end users to develop printing solutions quickly and at low cost. As users demand more and more customisation to fit their application, the DuraLink system demonstrates an approach to building print systems that allow application specific systems to be built quickly. Examples of the variety of designs possible and speed to create systems will be shared.
    09:45
    PLENARY SESSION: TBA
    Ricoh
    TBA
    10:15
    PLENARY SESSION: Solutions to enable high image quality in inkjet printing
    Xaar
    New markets, applications and their printing demands are now driving higher levels of print quality and the requirement to maintain it under more and more difficult conditions. Single-pass printers have limited capability to hide colour variations and defects compared with that of multi-pass, scanning printers. The ability to provide colour consistency is key to digital growth in many of the new markets and in some, any degree of non-uniformity is considered a barrier. In this presentation, Jesus Garcia, Chief Architect at Xaar, will talk about some of the current techniques already employed in applications and some of the newer options now available to enable digital inkjet to deliver high print quality.
    10:45
    PLENARY SESSION: Making printhead jettability wider
    Seiko Instruments
    TBA
    11:15
    NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK
    11:45
    Powerdrop: Taking pressure off the ink by jetting materials that add function
    Archipelago Technology
    Inkjet images are all about communication – whether its an image on a package demanding attention, a print on a T-shirt shouting through a crowd, or a more subtle message on a ceramic tile defining your taste in home décor. But invariably in any industrial printing application, the ink must deliver more than the message. The image must be robust, the ink must not flow into or through the substrate, and in some cases the application demands ‘inks’ that are simply incompatible with today’s sophisticated printheads. Archipelago is commercialising Powerdrop – a technology that jets viscous and sticky functional materials including primers, overcoats, varnishes, glazes and glues. These materials provide the functionality – a stable receptive surface, robustness, or adhesion – leaving the ink free to provide the message. Two years ago, Dan Mace (Archipelago’s COO) described how Powerdrop can be used to jet a wide range of materials. In this talk, Dan Mace will update you on Powerdrop, explain what we’ve achieved over the last two years and our plans for the next two years.
    12:15
    Translating 3D inkjet printing to an industrial manufacturing approach for medicines
    Added Scientific
    Many 3D printing techniques have the potential to revolutionize manufacturing industry and inkjet printing is one such method which can dispense liquid material in a form of tiny droplets through a printhead orifice. Several functional ink formulations have been developed for applications such as prototypes, electronics and medicines at University of Nottingham and a great effort has been input for industrial development at Added Scientific. A recent translation from 3D inkjet printing medicines to a scalable manufacturing approach for pharmaceutical industry has been explored where it shows a great potential to enable the precise fabrication of oral dosage forms for personalized medicines. The comparison of using 3D inkjet printing as a production tool compared to standard GMP conditions has been made, looking into the suitability, reliability and financial aspects of 3D printing medicines. This project has been funded by the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund with Xaar and AstraZeneca as partners.
    12:45
    Fully inkjet-printed, air stable OLEDs for signage and packaging applications
    Inuru
    While the figures of merit for inkjet-printed OLEDs lag behind those of vapor processed devices, the immense potential for savings, in terms of material consumption and processing costs, means that such devices are of huge commercial interest for mass production in applications where unit cost and architectural freedom dominate – namely in advertising and packaging signage. Over the last five years, Inuru GmbH has developed the requisite inks and technical know-how to fabricate fully inkjet-printed OLEDs, processed entirely under ambient air conditions, with device efficacies and lifetimes sufficient for sales increasing smart and active label and packaging applications. Initially providing custom packaging and label solutions to customers, Inuru now opens their data on the ink formulations for printing the constituent OLED layers from industrial piezo inkjet printheads. Besides emissive inks, we have developed air processable hole transport and electron transport layers with high and balanced hole and electron mobilities (both ~10-4 cm2 / V-1s-1), respectively. The development gave insight into main issues regarding processing and operation of organic materials under oxygen and water influence.
    13:15
    NETWORKING LUNCH
    14:30
    Benefits and challenges of digital printing for printed electronics
    Hahn-Schickard Society
    Digital printing technologies like inkjet or aerosol jet are gaining increasing importance for printed electronics. Their benefits include maskless deposition, easily adaptable layouts and simplified process chains. Nowadays many hybrid devices contain both printed functionalities like conductive tracks, dielectric layers, or sensor structures e.g. strain or temperature sensors and non-printed components such as SMDs or transistors. A major challenge here is how to connect printed with non-printed parts, another one is to find the right pre/posttreatment and printing parameters in order to obtain the desired functionality. This contribution presents benefits and challenges of digital functional printing based on our own experience with digitally printed nano-metal inks (Ag, Au, CuNi) on polymer substrates. Application examples include a demonstrator cube with inkjet-printed Au traces connected to LEDs via conductive adhesive. Furthermore, it is shown how substrate pre-treatment and the combination of sintering method, ink, and substrate decisively influence the printing results.
    15:00
    The novel silver nano ink: High conductive print without heating
    Kao Collins
    The novel silver nano ink using the dispersing technology obtained over 100 years of Kao’s surfactant research will be presented. The silver nano ink is designed to show the following properties: 1) room temperature stability storage, 2) dispersible in a wide range of solvents from water to alpha-terpineol, 3) narrow particle size distribution, 4) size controllable from 10 to 100nm, 5) microΩ.cm volume resistivity dried at room temperature, 6) printable by both thermal and piezo inkjet printheads, 7) creation of flexible devices (e.g. RFID antenna). We would like to discuss the science and applicability of the silver nano ink to digitally printed electronics ideas.
    15:30
    Inkjet-capable resists for partial surface treatment of glass and metal
    KIWO
    TBA
    16:00
    NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK
    16:30
    Inkjet 3D printing: High resolution and multi-material digital manufacturing
    ChemStream
    Inkjet 3D printing is a unique technology for the digital manufacturing of multi-material objects with high resolution. By combining different printheads in one single print job, complex objects composed of several interwoven materials having each a different physical (mechanical, optical, electrical), chemical or biological property can be manufactured. This allows for design of objects with unique properties and embedded functionalities. The high resolution of inkjet 3D printing allows for example the manufacturing of personalised ophthalmic lenses without any post-treatment step. ChemStream develops tailored UV inkjet 3D printing inks for several industrial applications. In this lecture we will give you insights on how inks can be wisely designed to obtain the desired properties of the final object, and how to take into account the layer-by-layer printing process in which the curing and spreading behavior of inks plays a crucial role.
    17:00
    Aqueous pigment ink innovations for the next generation of inkjet applications
    DuPont
    Aqueous pigment inks have broad relevance in digital inkjet applications, from well-established textile printing to emerging packaging markets. Pigments inks continue to evolve to address the innovation and market challenges in these spaces. This presentation will review technical challenges of various inkjet applications and why aqueous pigment ink technology offers the right solutions for the textile and packaging markets.
    17:30
    LED curable inkjet ink design: The balancing act
    AT Inks
    LED curable inkjet inks have gained popularity over the last many years due to the attributes like wide range of substrate compatibility, instant drying and 100% non-VOC components. However, the design of a high performing LED curable inkjet ink encompasses a careful balancing act and involves the consideration of various design parameters. A successful LED curable ink requires the perfect marriage between polymer science and colloid science. In this presentation we explore the few aspects of this two disciplines in the design of high quality LED curable inkjet inks and other external factors that make the ink design even more complex.
    18:00
    Formulating UV inkjet inks for a variety of industrial applications
    Agfa
    Inkjet is well established in the graphic industry but also strongly growing for industrial applications including product printing, decoration (especially interior), packaging, printed electronics and many more. For all these various applications, dedicated ink formulations are desired. Ink formulation development requires an in-depth analysis of the customer demands and application essentials. For every industrial application, an ink formulation has to be designed specifically for the substrate, system and printhead but in particular the characteristic process related to the application is a challenge for the ink design. Due to the different process workflows, the ink formulation is often unique and not transferable to another application. Several examples of ink formulation tuning will be explained.
    19:00
    NETWORKING DINNER
  • DAY 2 - Track 1 (30.10.2019)

    Time Topic
    09:00
    CONFERENCE INTRODUCTION
    09:15
    PLENARY SESSION: Inkjet printhead design: Approaches to modelling the complexity
    Fujifilm Dimatix
    As the industrial printing market demands higher performance, faster and smaller jets, the complexity of printhead nozzle architecture becomes increasing challenging to design and manufacture. This presentation will focus on some of the work Fujifilm Dimatix engages in to model key performance parameters for inkjet printhead design to enable effective and repeatable drop ejection at high print performance requirements, and how this relates to the nozzle architecture.
    09:45
    PLENARY SESSION: TBA
    Kyocera
    TBA
    10:15
    PLENARY SESSION: Making the most of Konica Minolta’s compact inkjet printhead technology
    Industrial Inkjet / Konica Minolta
    For over a decade, Konica Minolta has produced some of the most compact yet powerful inkjet printheads on the market. This technology has given advantages to customers in a multitude of applications, from signage to direct to shape printing. It is important to understand the key benefits to integrators and end users in terms of machine cost and capabilities, and how best to utilise the versatility of the heads. In their latest developments KM are bringing to market new models with additional enhancements such as nozzle level recirculation, improved drop accuracy and higher ink throughput, whilst maintaining the same slim footprint, so even more potential can be realised.
    10:45
    PLENARY SESSION: Advantage of real through channel recirculation and compact ink recirculation system
    Toshiba Tec
    TBA
    11:15
    NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK
    11:45
    Aqueous hybrid inkjet inks for sensitive applications
    Tiger Coatings
    Aqueous inkjet inks have gained increased attention of the industry due to their perfect suitability for sensitive applications like non-direct food contact, pharma, skin contact, interior, etc. The industrial applicability of the aqueous inkjet inks was also significantly supported by the advances in the printheads technologies, including close to nozzle recirculation. Nevertheless, practical implementation of the aqueous inkjet inks in the industrial processes requires usually a unique “wet” solution in order to fulfil customers’ expectations. Tiger’s approach for the realisation of digital printing with aqueous hybrid inkjet inks, challenges and outlooks will be presented and discussed.
    12:15
    Water based inkjet for packaging and tissue: Challenges and opportunities from the ink perspective
    Matthieu Carni
    TBA
    12:45
    Inkjet solutions for packaging applications
    Sun Chemical
    The packaging market is incredibly diverse and complex yet it is still highly attractive to developers of digital print technologies due to its potential market size. It is these complexities that make chemistry and process choices difficult for hardware developers and confusing for end customers. Sun Chemical aims to demystify the options, drawing on decades of experience as the leading ink and coatings supplier for packaging as well as decades of inkjet know how, by comparing the available options and looking at future trends and case studies.
    13:15
    NETWORKING LUNCH
    14:30
    Save energy! Fast drying and cost savings without conflict
    Lambda Technology
    The presentation shows the high potential for energy saving in the application process. It presents the connection between energy input and drying, as well as explains how drying can be efficient on different materials and how it can enhance the brilliance and colour gamut. NIR is a faster and cost-saving technical solution, also in combination with traditional dryer technology.
    15:00
    Infrared hybrid system for simultaneous multi-type drying
    Heraeus Noblelight
    As latest technology in printing industry evolves to continuous forms aqueous ink digital printers, many different drying methods and mechanisms are currently implemented within various printers. However, the interaction between these drying methods and their relative effectiveness for individual ink formulations is still challenging. The presentation will focus on a novel system design for infrared dryers, which includes three heat transfer mechanisms, considered individual or coupled, conduction, convection and radiation. Theoretical aspects of the drying processes from the perspective of flow and thermal management in the framework of new product development will be discussed. Topics such as wavelength selectivity according to spectral analysis of different types of water-based inks and depth penetration of the ink film boundary layer will be addressed.
    15:30
    Optimum drying for inkjet processes
    Adphos
    Inkjet processing has been widely established in graphical printing. In addition, inkjet-based processes are also adapted to other industrial applications. In this presentation several industrial applications for functional inkjet printing and coating are outlined and evaluated concerning optimised drying.
    16:00
    NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK
    16:30
    Colour inspection and process management
    Baumer Inspection
    “Only the paranoid survive” (Andy Grove, Intel). One of the challenges of industrial digital printing is to recognise strategic turning points in digitalisation and lead them to success with the right tools. What contribution can defect and colour inspection make to the challenges of increasingly complex technologies, smaller batch sizes, greater automation, reduced personnel deployment and greater cost pressure? Industrial digital printing is in this area of conflict. The lecture will show solutions to monitor the process comprehensively in order to be able to initiate the right corrective actions in time.
    17:00
    The application of degass module in inkjet industry and Chinese inkjet market analysis
    Cobetter Filtration
    We will discuss the product characteristics, specification selection and practical application of degass module in inkjet industry. With a share of over 90% in the domestic inkjet market, Cobetter is also the first company in China to independently develop and produce degassing products. In recent years, we have accumulated some practical application experience and data of degassing products, mainly from the application in printer ink system and ink factory production. This includes different structure and materials of existing degassing products, and how to choose materials and model in different situations. In addition, based on the existing extensive domestic customer base and the latest information from related major exhibitions, Cobetter updates market data and analyses development trends every year. This presentation will also discuss our statistical data.
    17:30
    BEST SPEAKER AWARDS
  • DAY 2 - Track 2 (30.10.2019)

    Time Topic
    09:00
    CONFERENCE INTRODUCTION
    09:15
    PLENARY SESSION: Inkjet printhead design: Approaches to modelling the complexity
    Fujifilm Dimatix
    As the industrial printing market demands higher performance, faster and smaller jets, the complexity of printhead nozzle architecture becomes increasing challenging to design and manufacture. This presentation will focus on some of the work Fujifilm Dimatix engages in to model key performance parameters for inkjet printhead design to enable effective and repeatable drop ejection at high print performance requirements, and how this relates to the nozzle architecture.
    09:45
    PLENARY SESSION: TBA
    Kyocera
    TBA
    10:15
    PLENARY SESSION: Making the most of Konica Minolta’s compact inkjet printhead technology
    Industrial Inkjet / Konica Minolta
    For over a decade, Konica Minolta has produced some of the most compact yet powerful inkjet printheads on the market. This technology has given advantages to customers in a multitude of applications, from signage to direct to shape printing. It is important to understand the key benefits to integrators and end users in terms of machine cost and capabilities, and how best to utilise the versatility of the heads. In their latest developments KM are bringing to market new models with additional enhancements such as nozzle level recirculation, improved drop accuracy and higher ink throughput, whilst maintaining the same slim footprint, so even more potential can be realised.
    10:45
    PLENARY SESSION: Advantage of real through channel recirculation and compact ink recirculation system
    Toshiba Tec
    TBA
    11:15
    NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK
    11:45
    Inkjet market update in graphics, packaging and industrial sectors
    Smithers Pira
    The presentation will share the latest Smithers Pira research into the use of inkjet with print-for-profit sectors. It will share our latest findings with updated 2019 data, highlighting the rapidly changing sectors, for example corrugated where both pre-print and post-print are growing rapidly. With drupa 2020 firmly on the horizon there will be a further boost to the technologies available, so some forecasts on what we will see and how these will open further applications.
    12:15
    New developments in print quality characterisation: How topography analysis provides addi-tional insights in combination with ink-substrate interaction studies
    Dataphysics
    High print quality is obtained when the ink optimally interacts with the substrate. For characterising the ink-substrate interaction contact angle measurements are carried out, preferably under inkjet conditions which is possible using the optical contour analysis system OCA 200 with the picodrop dosing system PDDS from DataPhysics Instruments. The measured contact angle, and thus the ink-substrate interaction, depends on the chemical properties of the ink and the substrate – but also on the substrate’s surface roughness. In order to take this aspect into account the contact angle study can be combined with a topography analysis with the new Surface Profile Analyzer SPA 25 from DataPhysics Instruments. The SPA 25 has a height resolution of up to 0.1 nm and allows determining surface roughness parameters that can be used to refine the contact angle results. Furthermore it is able to generate a three dimensional representation of the print image which provides valuable additional information to characterise the print quality. In our talk we show how the mentioned equipment is used to characterise the quality of some printed electronics. For this purpose the process of inkjet printing conducting bands with different colloidal metallic inks has been simulated with the PDDS. Afterwards the topography of the print image was analysed with the SPA 25. The latter was also used to characterise the bare substrate surface thus providing a refinement of the ink-substrate interaction analysis with the OCA 200.
    12:45
    Printhead coating for use of chemical aggressive inks and binders, dissolved oxygen and total gas measurement in printing inks
    UMS
    TBA
    13:15
    NETWORKING LUNCH
    14:30
    Ink and waveform performance optimisation
    ImageXpert
    This presentation focuses on in-depth knowledge of how to design and optimise waveforms for improved jetting performance. Waveforms are an essential, but often mysterious aspect of inkjet printing. The goal of waveform optimisation is getting the proper rhythm of ink in the nozzle to ensure consistent, stable jetting. This process was simplified with the invention of the dropwatcher, as the behaviour of drops using different waveforms could be analysed more closely. Once identified on the dropwatcher, these parameters could further be tested by sample printing and verifying the results by taking real time measurements of the printed sample using machine vision. ImageXpert will also provide a brief overview of tools to automate the process for designing and optimizing waveforms in order to save time during the development phase.
    15:00
    Tips, tools and techniques for printhead waveform optimisation
    Meteor Inkjet
    Printhead waveform development is often perceived as a complex but essential part of industrial inkjet system design. Following a review of the state-of-the-art in waveform optimisation techniques, useful tips and tools for efficient waveform development will be explored and real-world examples of both good and bad design will be shown.
    15:30
    What are the important physico-chemical parameters when formulating inks and how to characterise and optimise them
    Krüss
    Evonik is a major supplier for additives used for inkjet formulation. Krüss is the global market leader in surface tension, interfacial rheology and contact angle measuring equipment and has just released DSA Inkjet, an instrument to watch and analyse drops ejected from any inkjet head during flight. In this presentation we utilise the know-how and portfolio of both Evonik in the field of additives and Krüss in the field of instrumentation, respectively, to design and characterise specific model inks exhibiting typical fingerprint behaviour. We will present for example how changing the type of surfactant (e.g. acetylenic diol, alkane diol, siloxane polyethers, branched alcohol polyethers and other) will affect parameters such as dynamic surface tension, contact angle, wetting, interfacial rheology and jetting (drop volume, speed, satellites). As a result, this will represent a consequent continuation of our well received presentation at TheIJC 2018, where we focused more on the jetting of rather pure model fluids.
    16:00
    NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK
    16:30
    High shear rate rheology of inkjet inks by microfluidic rheometer
    Formulaction
    Understanding rheological behaviour of inks is a guarantee of high-quality results and limiting process issues like bleeding and splashing. FluidicamRHEO is designed for viscosity measurements of products from very fluid to thick formulations as a function of shear rate (up to 105 s-1) and temperature. A sample and a viscosity standard are pushed through a microfluidic chip (Y-junction) at controlled flow rates. Images of the resulting laminar co-flow are acquired and the position of the interface is measured. The position is related to the viscosity and the flow rate ratio allows viscosity determination of the sample. FLUIDICAMRHEO allows viscosity assessing in real process conditions of shear and temperature to improve the jetability and printing quality of inks. It provides viscosity measurement with less than 2 mL sample volume per flow curve in less than 3 minutes analysing time. Thus, the microfluidic system provides viscosity measurements without solvent evaporation or dying issues.
    17:00
    Particle sizing: An overview of myths and misconceptions about particle size
    Soliton/Entegris
    Particle sizing is a relatively common technique employed across a wide range of industrial and pharmaceutical applications. There exists a large number of different techniques for determining particle size, requiring the selection of a technique for any particular sample analysis. Most educational systems spend very little time educating students of the various techniques and their strengths and shortcomings. As a result, techniques chosen for any specific measurement may not be the best technique for characterising a particular product. In fact, may measurements made today are based on methods that are not well suited for the particular application. This presentation will provide an overview of a number of different measurement techniques, compare and contrast them, and point out their strengths and weaknesses. The emphasis will be on clarifying options available to analysists in order to achieve the best possible particle size measurements for a particular application. With the large number of techniques available, there have been many misconceptions fostered over the years regarding the meaning of the data produced by these different methods. A review of reference materials for determining the accuracy of these methods and brief commentary on these reference materials, often referred to as standards will be provided as well, along with some comments differentiating between a standard and a reference material.
    17:30
    BEST SPEAKER AWARDS
  • DAY 2 - Track 3 (30.10.2019)

    Time Topic
    09:00
    CONFERENCE INTRODUCTION
    09:15
    PLENARY SESSION: Inkjet printhead design: Approaches to modelling the complexity
    Fujifilm Dimatix
    As the industrial printing market demands higher performance, faster and smaller jets, the complexity of printhead nozzle architecture becomes increasing challenging to design and manufacture. This presentation will focus on some of the work Fujifilm Dimatix engages in to model key performance parameters for inkjet printhead design to enable effective and repeatable drop ejection at high print performance requirements, and how this relates to the nozzle architecture.
    09:45
    PLENARY SESSION: TBA
    Kyocera
    TBA
    10:15
    PLENARY SESSION: Making the most of Konica Minolta’s compact inkjet printhead technology
    Industrial Inkjet / Konica Minolta
    For over a decade, Konica Minolta has produced some of the most compact yet powerful inkjet printheads on the market. This technology has given advantages to customers in a multitude of applications, from signage to direct to shape printing. It is important to understand the key benefits to integrators and end users in terms of machine cost and capabilities, and how best to utilise the versatility of the heads. In their latest developments KM are bringing to market new models with additional enhancements such as nozzle level recirculation, improved drop accuracy and higher ink throughput, whilst maintaining the same slim footprint, so even more potential can be realised.
    10:45
    PLENARY SESSION: Advantage of real through channel recirculation and compact ink recirculation system
    Toshiba Tec
    TBA
    11:15
    NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK
    11:45
    Aerodynamics of direct-to-shape printing
    University of Cambridge
    We have previously reported the role of entrained airflows on printing precision when a flat surface passes below an industrial printhead. Scaled-down to a laboratory setup with a macro-scale visualisation technique, we observed the importance of a range of printing conditions on drop behaviour and linked these conditions to common printing defects. The work presented here reports on new research into the developed airflows and examines the increasing importance of aerodynamic effects when printing direct-to-shape. Using a system based on laser visualisation and seeded airflows, we analyse the crossflow profile and drop interactions during the printing process and will show parametric analyses using laboratory scale single nozzle devices as well as commercial multiple nozzle devices. We have observed the development of airflows complex dynamics with boundary layer separation, drop wake interaction and eddy development. The detailed knowledge of the crossflow and drop wake behaviour will allow us to develop methods to either avoid some of these physical phenomena or compensate for printing defects when printing directly to shape. We have also studied ways to quantify printing defects by studying printed patterns in order to help in improving feedback control techniques. This work will help in the integration of new functionalities onto industrial products.
    12:15
    Tolerances in industrial inkjet printing of μ-electronic device components
    Fraunhofer ENAS
    The inkjet technology is an additive, contactless, scalable, versatile and digital deposition tool which promotes precise patterning of functional electronic materials in μm scale over variety of substrates. Two of the most essential electronic devices which are often manufactured using inkjet technology are the capacitors and thin-film-transistors (TFTs). The literature over the last decade shows the evolution of these printed devices and the trends toward achieving high performance devices but exclude the consideration of various tolerances e.g. manufacturing yield and electrical deviations. The definition of these tolerances becomes extremely vital for realising electronic circuits based on multiple level devices. In this paper, we have focused on developing a scalable deposition process using industrialised inkjet technology and commercial materials which can bring positive outlook to the manufacturing value chain in the field of printed electronics. The manufacturing of such inkjet-printed devices are executed under ambient condition and below processing temperature of 150 °C, thus enabling the utilisation of flexible PEN film as substrate. Several arrays containing more than 900 devices (capacitors or TFTs) were manufactured over an area of DIN A4 (297 × 210 mm²). This facilitates generation of huge statistical data for the determination of tolerances as function of device design, layout, physical dimension, material etc. The results show that fully operational TFTs can be obtained with manufacturing yield of about 80 % and electrical tolerance less than 30 %.
    12:45
    Distant jetting for direct-to-shape printing
    iPrint Institute
    The jetting distance is an important parameter for many different applications including direct-to-shape printing. The presented study shows the methodology to determine the maximum possible distance between the printhead and the substrate that still provides the required quality for graphical images on shaped surfaces. The applied method is shown with the example of printed 3D puzzle pieces with the goal to validate the printing process with stability and printing quality tests. First, the different printheads are evaluated with a list of criteria to fulfil in order to increase the jetting distance. The key parameters include drop size, drop velocity and printhead reliability. Then, the printing strategy is elaborated and tried on a few printheads to achieve a final acceptable result. The technical route is to maximise the speed with the creation of small drops. As the stability of the drop is better with a bigger volume, multi-pulses have been used to create multi-drops that will merge and increase the volume. This strategy uses the long distance jetting requirement as an advantage. Finally, the waveform to eject the drops is optimised and accepted using the stability tests. The position of the drop is measured multiple times and the average and standard deviation determine the jet straightness. The final look of the printed pattern is evaluated with the microscope to validate the waveform and printing process.
    13:15
    NETWORKING LUNCH
    14:30
    Flow induced damage and chemistry within printing flow systems
    University of Cambridge
    Polymeric materials are ubiquitous in applications such as flexible organic electronics, self-healing materials, printed pharmaceuticals and bioprinting. Inkjet printing is proving very attractive because these materials are often processed in an appropriate solution phase and there are industry needs identified for low volume, customised digital manufacturing. However, functional materials can be degraded and damaged during printing, most commonly seen for example as a reduction in polymer molecular weight. This is attributed to polymer elongation due to the very high shear forces experienced during printing. Our work focuses on developing lab based flow systems and simulations to understand and ultimately control these mechanical forces. Recent research in the area of mechanochemistry has shown that similar forces need not be destructive but may in fact be used to create programmable catalytic material, drive crosslinking reactions or even provide access to new reaction pathways. We describe here how we quantify the forces and build systems to explore the prospect of using normally destructive forces to create and modulate properties during processing. We will examine the use of mechanical shear force to drive chemical reactions and control the function of the ink.
    15:00
    Optimising complex rheological properties of inkjet ink for ideal formulation and reliable jetting
    Trijet
    Inkjet fluid rheology is just one of the key parameters that affect the whole inkjet process and can interact with other parameters in a complex way. As inkjet moves towards higher print frequencies, drop velocity to achieve higher productivity, the complex rheological behaviour of the ink and its components at the application conditions becomes increasingly important. Attempting to jet fluid that has different dynamic properties at jetting conditions and/or fluid that has not fully recovered in the printhead channel post jetting results in meniscus instability, drop velocity variations, poor reliability, and print defects. Any minor changes in the components or batch variations of formulation can drastically change complex rheology. This affects fluid flow dynamics in the conduit, in-flight jetting and break-up behaviour. Over the last 15 years, significant research has been carried out in developing rheological tools that can characterise inks at the jetting conditions mainly at (i) high frequency to mimic printhead in-channel conditions during waveform actuation, (ii) high shear rates to mimic nozzle conditions during jetting and (iii) extensional mode to mimic in-flight conditions. We will present novel rheological tools capable of quantifying complex rheology of inkjet at relevant jetting timescale and geometry and their subsequent effect on the jetting behaviour. We will present real case examples where such tools have been incorporated in (i) development and quality control of inks to differentiate between apparently identical inks but that resulted in different jetting behaviour and (ii) recommendation of optimum jetting temperature, print frequency and waveform conditions.
    15:30
    Effects of ink, substrate and target line width on the line quality printed using a materials inkjet printer
    Rochester Institute of Technology
    This study deals with the image quality analysis of inkjet lines printed on various substrates. ISO 24790 compliant lines are designed and printed on a substrate with a drop-on-demand inkjet printer. This study analyses three print quality attributes of line: width, blurriness, and raggedness. The research used cyan, magnetic and standard inks to print the same design on various substrates having differences in gloss and texture. The print attributes were measured, and statistical analysis was conducted. Based on this analysis, it was observed that substrate has significant effect on all the response variables. Luster showed best results for raggedness and line width and matte for blurriness. Ink has significant effect on the line width conformity and raggedness whereas there is no significant effect of inks on blurriness. There is no effect of increase in the line width on any of the response variables. A design of experiment methodology was successfully implemented to determine the effect of surface properties of the substrate and the effect of ink properties on line quality.
    16:00
    NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK
    16:30
    Selective inkjet coating of PCBs with paraffin wax
    iPrint Institute
    For protection against moisture and consequent corrosion, printed circuit boards (PCBs) with enhanced environmental protection are, after assembly with electronic components, selectively coated with a protective film, a so called conformal coating. The main current methods for selective electronics coating are spray painting, which has good productivity but very limited resolution, and micro dispensing, which has limited productivity and cannot economically be upscaled. Inkjet technology on the other hand does provide sufficient resolution and the necessary scalability needed in large volume production for selective conformal PCB coatings, but the main drawback is its limitation in throw distance, which is in most applications only a few millimetres against component heights in excess of 10 millimetres on many PCBs. By optimising drop volumes and speeds by means of waveform tuning, reliable throw distances can however greatly increased. In this presentation a solution for selective inkjet-printed conformal PCB coatings with a paraffin based wax at a throw distance of 15 millimetres is presented.
    17:00
    Robot guided functional inkjet printing on non-planar surfaces for electronic applications
    Fraunhofer ENAS
    Nowadays, two clear trends characterise mass-market products as they can be found within the automotive, white goods or aerospace industry. The development of the last decade showed an increased demand for electrical functions and individualised solutions. The growing amount of functional elements such as Bluetooth antennas for communication, sensors for condition monitoring in a car, or lighting and multimedia applications on airplanes lead to an increasing complexity of electrical wiring. Up to this day the assembly and interconnection of such electronics is still performed manually by human hand. As the growing complexity will increase costs continuously the industry shows great interest for alternative automated manufacturing approaches. Drop on demand inkjet technology can be used for the deposition of functional electrical conductive, semi-conductive, or insulating material to realise printed conductors, capacitors, or antennas. The application of inkjet printing is well-established in planar roll-to-roll or sheet-to-sheet processes. Current research efforts show an investigation regarding inkjet technology in combination with multi-dimensional motion systems in order to access printing on three-dimensional objects – so far mostly for graphical printing. Aside from solely imaging purposes, this technology also offers another usability – as manufacturing tool for conductive paths and simple electronic components in the third dimension. Parts of a car’s wire harness could be printed directly onto a door or the chassis and help to decrease the amount of required human labour. Furthermore, digital printing technologies allow to change print patterns instantaneously from one print job to another. Within a serial production line where equal objects passing by such a robot printing system would enable the individualisation of each single work piece according to the costumers’ requirements. So far, only a few scientific research publications are addressing the topic of “functional inkjet printing on non-planar surfaces”. This presentation will show how a 6-axis robot arm equipped with an industrial inkjet printhead was used to print insulating and conductive tracks on different non-planar objects, e.g. the outer shell of a car door or a metallic canister. Basic experiments were performed regarding the maximum applicable printing distance, speed, and influence of printhead orientation against the direction of gravity force, as well as adhesion, electrical properties, and uniformity of the printed patterns.
    17:30
    BEST SPEAKER AWARDS
  • 1

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Next InkJet Conference

TheIJC 2019 
29-30 October 2019
Düsseldorf/Neuss, Germany

About Us

TheIJC is a joint event by ESMA (European Specialist Manufacturers Association) and Digital Direct Technologies.

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